7/31/11

Comic-Book Heroes Help Change Image of Islam - NYTimes.com

“Most articles about Islam these days involve terrorism, so that was my challenge: How do I redefine this? The media not only reflects reality but can help change the course of reality,” said Dr. Naif Al-Mutawa, creator of “The 99,” during a speech at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity last month. “The idea was to reposition Islam not only to the West, but to Muslims themselves as well.”

“The 99,” features Islam-inspired characters, based on the 99 attributes of Allah, who discover magic stones that unleash powers like superhuman strength, ability to read minds, and to teleport. And, in true super-hero style, they use these powers to fight bad guys.

Comic-Book Heroes Help Change Image of Islam - NYTimes.com

Alhazen - Language and philosophy - Arabic Roots exhibition | Royal Society

Language and philosophy - Arabic Roots exhibition | Royal Society: "The tenth century polymath Ibn al-Haytham, known in the west as Alhazen, was known as ‘The Physicist’ and ‘Ptolemy the Second’ in Europe. He is recognized as a pioneer of scientific method for his development of an experimental method of scientific testing to verify hypotheses. He left behind the notorious Alhazen problem (only solved in 1997): 'Given a light source and a spherical mirror, find the point on the mirror where the light will be reflected to the eye of an observer.'"

Jabir Ibn Hayyan (Geber) - Chemistry - Arabick Roots exhibition | Royal Society

Chemistry - Arabick Roots exhibition | Royal Society: "This legendary polymath (721 - 815) excelled in many fields but it is his achievements in chemistry that made him famous in medieval Europe. The name ‘Geber’ was used by an anonymous European writer in the 13th century as a pen-name for his book on alchemy. Geber believed in experimentation: ‘The first essential in chemistry is that thou shouldest perform practical work and conduct experiments, for he who performs not practical work nor makes experiments will never attain to the least degree of mastery’. For such experiments he is credited with developing many items of chemical laboratory equipment."

Arabic astronomers - Astronomy - Arabick Roots exhibition | Royal Society

Astronomy - Arabick Roots exhibition | Royal Society: "Several 17th century astronomers made the effort to learn Arabic and Persian to have access to observations that would help them settle topical astronomical debates. This included the first five Savilian professors of Astronomy at Oxford. Some, like John Greaves, travelled to the Arab world where they made observations, learned Arabic and collected manuscripts."